Ways to close a tough sale

29
1
Share:
cwadohewqae

INTRODUCTION

The following describes techniques or methods that the salesperson can use to attempt to close the sale. You will note that closing attempts can occur:

  1. MINOR CLOSE – During the presentation itself – “Trial Close.”
  2. MAJOR CLOSE – Following the conclusion of the presentation – Six Methods discussed below

1.0 METHOD USED “DURING” THE PRESENTATION (MINOR CLOSE)

TRIAL CLOSE

DEFINED: A minor closing attempt made at an opportune time during the sales presentation to encourage the customer to reveal readiness or unwillingness to buy.

WHEN USED: Most appropriate after obtaining sufficient agreements to buy AND getting “buying signals.”

EXAMPLE: After matching need with feature/benefit and confirmation, “Do you think your attendees will be happy with these junior suites?” “Would you like to formalize these arrangements?”

 

2.0 METHODS USED “AFTER” THE PRESENTATION & OVERCOMING OF OBJECTIONS. (MAJOR CLOSE)

SUMMARY-OF-THE BENEFITS CLOSE

DEFINED: A reemphasis of the benefits that will help bring about a favorable decision. Summarizes the most important buyer benefits that will produce a favorable decision.

WHEN USED: The salesperson has overcome all objections and there are no more. Logical conclusion to the presentation.

EXAMPLE: “We can get the ball rolling by signing this letter of agreement.” A “DIRECT-APPEAL” CLOSE IS USED HERE.

 

2.2 ASSUMPTION CLOSE

DEFINED: An assumption that the prospect is going to buy. An assumption that the prospect has already bought the product.

WHEN USED: It comes near the end of the planned presentation after a genuine need has been identified, solutions/benefits have been presented, and objections have been handled satisfactorily.

EXAMPLE: Ask one or more questions regarding a minor point or begin writing up the order. “Shall I indicate “master billing” on the letter of agreement?”

 

2.3 SPECIAL-CONCESSION CLOSE

DEFINED: Offers the buyer something extra for acting immediately.

WHEN USED: Use carefully because some buyers are skeptical of concessions. Use to “push-on-over” the prospect that seems to be on the edge of a decision.

EXAMPLE: Special price reduction, a more liberal credit plan, or an added feature that was not anticipated by the prospect. “As an added bonus, we can host (comp) your group’s reception party on the night of arrival.”

 

2.4 SINGLE-PROBLEM CLOSE

DEFINED: A single objection that stands in the way of a close. You have already eliminated all objections but this one.

WHEN USED: It will generally surface on a “Trial Close.” Handle immediately when recognized.

EXAMPLE: “Mr. Prospect, it seems that you like all of the benefits that we have discussed except this one. Is that right? If I could take care of this, would you sign the letter of agreement?”

“Let’s review all of the superior benefits that you will have if you go with us: … “ Then Indirect Denial followed by one of 7 techniques to overcome objections.

 

2.5 LIMITED-CHOICE CLOSE

DEFINED: A choice provided to the prospect as a way of “Qualifying” the prospect.

WHEN USED: After prospect seems unable to decide but you know that benefits have been “sold.” How to do:

(a) Allow prospect to examine several different “choice packages” and try to assess his/her degree of interest.

(b) Cease showing new choices when it appears that the prospect has been given ample selection.

(c) Remove product that the prospect does not seem genuinely interested in.

(d) Concentrate on products the prospect seems to be definitely interested in.

EXAMPLE: “It appears that these two choices are your primary interest. Is that right? The pluses and minuses of each are these: Which one would you like?”

 

2.6 DIRECT-APPEAL CLOSE

DEFINED: Asking for the order in a straightforward manner.

WHEN USED: After all benefits have been presented and agreed to. Don’t use too early.

EXAMPLE: “Can we formalize our agreement with your signature on this letter of agreement?” Can I send you the letter of agreement?”

 

SOURCE

Share:

Subscribe to ProcessCARE's Sales Blog

Join more than 3,000+ business owners! Get the latest insight and sales tips straight to your inbox. Enter your email address below: